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Northern India

In the Indian states of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, the Freedom Fund is investing in a comprehensive intervention, supporting 22 partners to address all forms of slavery across 24 districts. In this hotspot, slavery is especially common in agriculture, brick kilns and stone quarries, the commercial sex industry, and domestic work.

Partners run a range of programs, providing communities with economic alternatives and information about their rights, rescuing victims from exploitative workplaces, and giving legal aid in support of criminal prosecutions of traffickers.

Click here to read more about the Northern India program. The 2015 impact report for the Northern India hotspot can be viewed here.

LIVES IMPACTED 109,800
NUMBER OF PEOPLE LIBERATED 7,557
NUMBER OF AT-RISK CHILDREN IN SCHOOL 14,200
COST PER PERSON $37
Total Invested$4.57m

Metric

Total

Lives impacted

Number of active, regular participants of programs supported by the Freedom Fund. Includes members of community vigilance committees, self-help groups, individuals rescued from slavery, and those given educational, psychosocial or income generation services. Excludes those provided with one-time information.

109,800

Total invested

Total funds invested in hotspot programs since the Freedom Fund’s inception.

$4,565,284

Cost per person

Average cost of community interventions per active, regular participant. Excludes grants made to partners working indirectly, e.g. at international policy level or for research and evaluation purposes. Excludes grants made for research and evaluation purposes.

$37

Victims liberated

Number of people liberated from any form of slavery, be it through gradual change of circumstance or shorter “rescue event”. The Freedom Fund’s approach is to only support liberations where services for survivor recovery are provided. We formalised this policy with partners in July 2016. Prior to this date a small proportion of reported liberations may not have included follow-up support.

Survivor recovery services are provided (by Freedom Fund partner or other agency) to ensure the individual can resettle with their family or independently, and can access socio-economic and legal assistance to ensure their freedom can be sustained.

7,557

Community freedom groups supported

Number of active, local groups, including community vigilance committees and self-help savings and loans groups, formed or supported by Freedom Fund partners.

1,197

At-risk children in school

Number of previously out-of-school children in slavery-affected communities now attending formal or informal education as a result of Freedom Fund support.

14,200

Graduates of vocational training

Number of slavery survivors or highly vulnerable individuals completing vocational training courses provided or referred by Freedom Fund partners.

1,481

Micro-enterprises started

Number of slavery survivors or highly vulnerable individuals who have started micro-enterprises as a result of Freedom Fund support

5,871

Survivors accessing psychosocial services

Number of slavery survivors and victims provided with psychosocial support services to help them recover from mental trauma and avoid falling back into situations of extreme exploitation.

3,397

Individuals with new access to gov't services

Number of people supported by our partners who gain new access to government entitlements such as employment rights, school places, pensions, compensation payments, ID cards, and land rights.

8,010

Legal cases assisted

Number of individual legal cases that our partners provide any kind of support to, including advice, testimony, direct litigation, and witness protection.

654

Arrests

Number of arrests of traffickers and slaveholders in which one or more Freedom Fund partners played a key supporting role.

149

Convictions

Number of convictions of traffickers and slaveholders in which one or more Freedom Fund partners played a key supporting role.

15

Media stories

Number of media stories about slavery and trafficking that can be attributed to the Freedom Fund or its partners’ efforts to generate attention to the issue.

62

See more global metrics.


OUR PARTNERS*

Aangan Trust
Access Livelihoods Consulting India Ltd.
Adithi
Bhusura Mahila Vikas Samiti
Centre DIRECT
Childhood Enhancement through Training and Action
Fakirana Sisters’ Society
Free the Slaves
Guria Swayam Sevi Sansthan
Institute for Development Education and Action
Healing Fields
Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex
Integrated Development Foundation
Justice Ventures International
Manav Sansadhan Evam Mahila Vikas Sansthan
National Institute for Rural Development, Education, Social Upliftment and Health
Pragati Gramodyog Evam Samaj Kalyan Sansthan
Prayas Juvenile Aid Centre
Regions Beyond Medical Union Society
Rural Organisation for Social Advancement
Tatvasi Samaj Nyas
Thomson Reuters Foundation

*Organisations that have received an instalment of funds from the Freedom Fund in Q4 2016. The Freedom Fund works with a range of other partners but they have not received an instalment of funding during this quarter.


RESEARCH AND EVALUATION

The following research studies and evaluations are currently underway in the Northern India hotspot program:

Research on the Socio-Economic Benefits of Eradication of Slavery, Uttar Pradesh, India

Harvard University FXB Center for Health and Human Rights

Evaluation of Northern India Hotspot Program

Institute for Development Studies, University of Sussex 


SUCCESS STORIES

12 year old Sangeeta* and her four sisters used to work with their parents in a brick kiln. Even though they all worked many hours each day, the brick kiln owner did not pay sufficient wages. When they asked for an increase in their wages, the owner began to physically abuse them. 
One day, an MSEMVS staff member came to their community and explained the project activities in the area.

As a result, Sangeeta’s father joined an MSEMVS community vigilance committee (CVC) and collectively they are pressing for improvements at the kiln. The family enrolled Sangeeta in MSEMVS’ transitional school for out-of-school youth. 
Sangeeta became increasingly aware of the importance of education and helps other students at school. At the school, the students also learn about issues like unsafe migration, human trafficking, debt bondage. Sangeeta is passionate about what she’s been learning and has become an active member of the children’s forum, which meets with village officials to try to improve conditions in the area.

*Name changed to protect identity.